Now Watch me Zip

ac zipline6To zip or not to zip? That was the question that we had to answer on a sweltering day in Montego Bay, Jamaica. We had gone there with a group of other travel professionals to familiarize ourselves with what that island paradise has to offer. We drove around the island touring many of the beautiful resorts, dining on sumptuous Jamaican cuisine, and enjoying many of the activities like Green Grotto Caves and Dunn’s River Falls. One morning we split into smaller groups and our group leader suggested going up to zipline after lunch. I had never done it before, so I had some serious reservations. But I figured what the heck, how rough could it be? I soon found out. Our merry band of 10 loaded into a van and began the trek up the hill, into the rain forest to begin our zipline canopy tour. Even the ride up the hill was a bit of an off-road adventure and we kept climbing, and climbing and climbing. Once we arrived at the destination we were ushered to a covered platform where we met our tour guides/canopy specialists.

zipline prepThey gave us a thorough safety briefing and instruction on how to stop and where hands should (and should not) go. There was a lot of information to absorb, but I did my best. Then they outfitted each of us with a helmet, leather work gloves and the safety harness that attached to the overhead lines.

I was getting more apprehensive (actually I was downright scared), but there was no turning back at that point. I wondered how fast I’d go, zipping along at the speed of my own body weight. I soon found out. Our guides led us out of the open shack and I figured that it was time to zip….not quite. First we had a LONG trek through the rainforest. There were more than 300 uneven wooden steps to traverse, some uphill, some downhill, and all slippery from the humidity. That was quite a workout, to say the least.

By the time we finally reached the first of 10 platforms/launchpads, I’d kind of lost my notion to zip. Then, the adventure began. They attached the first person’s harness to the line and off he went. I was number 6 in line, right behind my husband.

bob flies closeupI figured I could watch him and see how he fared. Or maybe he could catch me if I got into trouble. He took off like a champ and before I knew it, it was my turn.

ac unhooks3The guide secured my harness, told me to jump and off I went. What a rush! I felt like Tarzan (OK Jane) flying through the treetops. Before long I saw the next platform looming up ahead and I tried desperately to remember what they’d told us to do when it was time to stop – I’d forgotten completely, so I plowed into the guide at that platform with full force. Apparently I wasn’t the first to do that, and he caught me easily, unhooked my harness and connected it to the next line. Away I went. After the third run, I got so good that I started doing tricks – zipping backwards.

ac flies3Actually, my harness got reversed  and I couldn’t figure out how to turn back around. Let me tell you, zipping backwards is a serious rush.

Just about the time I was really getting the hang of it they “upped the ante” with a vertical drop. Yep, straight down for ~40 feet. That was a real surprise.

There was always a slight feeling of danger since I was so close to the trees on both sides; at most 2-3 feet on either side.

It kept getting better. The grand finale was a 1,265 foot long traverse where it’s possible to travel at over 35 mph – and I did. What a kick!

When the last of our group finished our guides led us on a nice stroll back to the van. It was along a smooth path lined with lush flora and fauna.

jamaica greeneryOur guides were full of botanical information about the plants and trees that we passed. Like this lobster claw plant.

lobster clawIt really was a wonderful, exhilarating experience that I recommend highly. Here’s a tip though. If you plan to go, take some latex gloves of your own to go inside of the leather gloves. Here’s why. Those leather gloves are used again and again by dozens of perspiring people everyday. The perspiration and the humid climate combine to make them quite mildewed and sour smelling. Even after washing our hands repeatedly with soap and hot water we couldn’t get rid of that pungent aroma for several hours. But it was well worth it and we’re really glad we did it.

lees after ziipline

 

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